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Comfrey Oil (Organic)

0.100000

6,60 €

,also known as gum plant, healing herb, slippery root, knitbone and blackwort.

History
Comfrey is a member of the borage family and its oil has been used as a healing herb for centuries. The ancient Greeks and Romans used it to stop bleeding and heal cuts. It is a plant native to Asia and Europe, but is also now grown in the United States and Australia.

Uses
Comfrey oil is used to treat many ailments and injuries including burns, lacerations, rashes, psoriasis, eczema, insect bites, swelling, bruises, sprains, nerve pain, broken bones and arthritis. It is also used as a skin moisturizer and a wrinkle deterrent, and to diminish scarring and stretch marks.

Active Ingredient
The roots and leaves of comfrey contain allantoin, which is known to break down red blood cells and possibly increase white blood cell production. This aids in the healing of wounds by accelerating new tissue growth.

Skin Care
This is a macerated oil, the colour of deep green because of the allantoin content in comfrey. Comfrey roots have been macerated in organic high oleic sunflower oil. Because the high oleic content gives this sunflower oil the same properties as sweet almond oil, this is a long oil, making it very good for long massage strokes used in whole body massage. It is therefore good for enhancing whole body massage oils and generally any products that need good lubrication properties. The base oil also is soft and smooth, promoting skin suppleness.

Comfrey oil also contains tannins, glycosides and is an excellent source of B12, so very appropriate in creams for vegetarians and vegans who are short of this essential vitamin. It also contains a vegetable protein and is cell proliferant, rebuilding damaged cells.

In creams, it can repair damage caused by surgery, acne, or eczema and is an essential vegetable oil for your healing preparations. In cream and lotion preparations for athletes, it aids torn muscles, ligaments and strains. In preparations for mature women, it assists in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis.

Cooking
Comfrey macerated oil should not be used for cooking.

Contraindications
Whether or not comfrey is safe to use is an area of controversy. Generally, it is currently accepted that external application of comfrey poses little risk of alkaloid seepage into the skin but we advise you to check with a medical herbalist if you are unsure whether to use the oil. Because we cannot know individual circumstances or health conditions, we do not suggest that you use comfrey oil/products in any form when pregnant or breastfeeding or if you have a current or historical problem with your liver.

Do not use comfrey externally on new puncture wounds or deep cuts because the outer layers of skin will be stimulated by the comfrey to close and heal the outer layers of skin before there is time to drain and regenerate the deeper tissues.

In these cases you can first apply calendula oil and once the swelling and pain have subsided and the wound is clean, drained and healing normally, comfrey oil may be safely applied to speed up the wound healing process effectively. Note: You may use a 20% solution of chamomile hydrolate in water to clean the wound.

First Aid
It’s very beneficial to blend comfrey macerated oil with calendula oil as they have a synergistic healing effect. Other good macerated oils to blend with comfrey oil are St. John’s wort oil and arnica oil.

For Warming Effects in Sports Massage Blends
Blend comfrey macerated oil with avocado and castor oils.

How Comfrey Oil Is Made and Used
The root and leaves of comfrey are ground up and added to canola oil. Comfrey oil can also be made by infusing oil with extracts from the plant's roots and leaves. The oil is rubbed directly onto the affected area of the body and provides long-lasting relief. It can also be used as a bath oil to soothe eczema and other itchy skin afflictions.

Warnings
Comfrey oil should not be used on a dirty wound, as it can heal the skin over the wound and trap the dirt inside. It also should not be used on deep wounds as comfrey contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids which have been linked to liver cancer. Therefore, avoid getting comfrey oil directly into the bloodstream. Comfrey oil should never be ingested.

Caution
When using comfrey oil for postoperative clients, such as people who have had hip replacements it is VERY important to allow a period of 2-3 months before applying comfrey oil. This is to allow the deeper tissue to heal. You can use calendula oil in the first 2-3 months and then combine it or use comfrey oil on its own after this initial period.

Comfrey Oil (Organic) <p>,also known as gum plant, healing herb, slippery root, knitbone and blackwort.</p> <p><strong>History</strong><br />Comfrey is a member of the borage family and its oil has been used as a healing herb for centuries. The ancient Greeks and Romans used it to stop bleeding and heal cuts. It is a plant native to Asia and Europe, but is also now grown in the United States and Australia.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong><br />Comfrey oil is used to treat many ailments and injuries including burns, lacerations, rashes, psoriasis, eczema, insect bites, swelling, bruises, sprains, nerve pain, broken bones and arthritis. It is also used as a skin moisturizer and a wrinkle deterrent, and to diminish scarring and stretch marks.</p> <p><strong>Active Ingredient</strong><br />The roots and leaves of comfrey contain allantoin, which is known to break down red blood cells and possibly increase white blood cell production. This aids in the healing of wounds by accelerating new tissue growth.</p> <p><strong>Skin Care</strong><br />This is a macerated oil, the colour of deep green because of the allantoin content in comfrey. Comfrey roots have been macerated in organic high oleic sunflower oil. Because the high oleic content gives this sunflower oil the same properties as sweet almond oil, this is a long oil, making it very good for long massage strokes used in whole body massage. It is therefore good for enhancing whole body massage oils and generally any products that need good lubrication properties. The base oil also is soft and smooth, promoting skin suppleness.</p> <p>Comfrey oil also contains tannins, glycosides and is an excellent source of B12, so very appropriate in creams for vegetarians and vegans who are short of this essential vitamin. It also contains a vegetable protein and is cell proliferant, rebuilding damaged cells.</p> <p>In creams, it can repair damage caused by surgery, acne, or eczema and is an essential vegetable oil for your healing preparations. In cream and lotion preparations for athletes, it aids torn muscles, ligaments and strains. In preparations for mature women, it assists in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis.</p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong><br />Comfrey macerated oil should not be used for cooking.</p> <p><strong>Contraindications</strong><br />Whether or not comfrey is safe to use is an area of controversy. Generally, it is currently accepted that external application of comfrey poses little risk of alkaloid seepage into the skin but we advise you to check with a medical herbalist if you are unsure whether to use the oil. Because we cannot know individual circumstances or health conditions, we do not suggest that you use comfrey oil/products in any form when pregnant or breastfeeding or if you have a current or historical problem with your liver.</p> <p>Do not use comfrey externally on new puncture wounds or deep cuts because the outer layers of skin will be stimulated by the comfrey to close and heal the outer layers of skin before there is time to drain and regenerate the deeper tissues.</p> <p>In these cases you can first apply calendula oil and once the swelling and pain have subsided and the wound is clean, drained and healing normally, comfrey oil may be safely applied to speed up the wound healing process effectively. Note: You may use a 20% solution of chamomile hydrolate in water to clean the wound.</p> <p><strong>First Aid</strong><br />It’s very beneficial to blend comfrey macerated oil with calendula oil as they have a synergistic healing effect. Other good macerated oils to blend with comfrey oil are St. John’s wort oil and arnica oil.</p> <p>For Warming Effects <strong>in Sports Massage Blends</strong><br />Blend comfrey macerated oil with avocado and castor oils.</p> <p><strong>How Comfrey Oil Is Made and Used</strong><br />The root and leaves of comfrey are ground up and added to canola oil. Comfrey oil can also be made by infusing oil with extracts from the plant's roots and leaves. The oil is rubbed directly onto the affected area of the body and provides long-lasting relief. It can also be used as a bath oil to soothe eczema and other itchy skin afflictions.</p> <p><strong>Warnings</strong><br />Comfrey oil should not be used on a dirty wound, as it can heal the skin over the wound and trap the dirt inside. It also should not be used on deep wounds as comfrey contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids which have been linked to liver cancer. Therefore, avoid getting comfrey oil directly into the bloodstream. Comfrey oil should never be ingested.</p> <p><strong>Caution</strong><br />When using comfrey oil for postoperative clients, such as people who have had hip replacements it is VERY important to allow a period of 2-3 months before applying comfrey oil. This is to allow the deeper tissue to heal. You can use calendula oil in the first 2-3 months and then combine it or use comfrey oil on its own after this initial period.</p>
6,60 €

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